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Ecology, 86(11), 2005, pp. 29792989 2005 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 2979
Ecology, 86(11), 2005, pp. 29792989
2005 by the Ecological Society of America
ENEMY RELEASE? AN EXPERIMENT WITH CONGENERIC PLANT PAIRS
AND DIVERSE ABOVE- AND BELOWGROUND ENEMIES
ANURAG A. AGRAWAL,1,5
PETER M. KOTANEN,2
CHARLES E. MITCHELL,1,6
ALISON G. POWER,1
WILLIAM GODSOE,3,7
AND JOHN KLIRONOMOS4
1Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Corson Hall Ithaca, New York 14853-2701 USA
2Department of Botany, University of Toronto at Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road North,
Mississauga, Ontario L5L 1C6 Canada
3Department of Botany, 25 Willcocks Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3B2 Canada
4Department of Integrative Biology, University of Guelph, 50 Stone Road East Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 Canada
Abstract. Several hypotheses proposed to explain the success of introduced species
focus on altered interspecific interactions. One of the most prominent, the Enemy Release
Hypothesis, posits that invading species benefit compared to their native counterparts if
they lose their herbivores and pathogens during the invasion process. We previously reported

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University
Kotanen, Peter M. - Department of Biology, University of Toronto at Mississauga
Mitchell, Charles - Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology