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A pattern correlation model of vestibulo-ocular reex habituation T.J. Anastasio*
 

Summary: A pattern correlation model of vestibulo-ocular re¯ex habituation
T.J. Anastasio*
Beckman Institute and Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, The University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign, Urbana, USA
Received 15 September 2000; revised 22 September 2000; accepted 22 September 2000
Abstract
Through the process of habituation, the response of the vestibulo-ocular re¯ex (VOR) is decreased by prolonged, sinusoidal stimulation at
lower frequencies (#0.1 Hz). Research on gold®sh has uncovered frequency-speci®c and nonlinear behaviors associated with habituation of
the gold®sh VOR, which include phenomena that cannot be explained using dynamic linear and static nonlinear models. The unexplained
phenomena are abrupt decreases at peak response, gain decreases far in excess of linear predictions based on phase, and violation of
superposition. Their existence was attributed to a hypothetical switch that closed in the appropriate context. The pattern correlation
model provides a new perspective on the process of VOR habituation. Rather than treat the stimulus as a continuous sinusoid, the pattern
correlation model breaks it up into a number of discontinuous patterns. The pattern most closely correlated with the current stimulus then
decreases the VOR response by the amount of that correlation times a pre-assigned weight. The pattern correlation model explains how the
frequency-speci®c and the nonlinear behaviors may be related, and how the apparent switching phenomena may occur. q 2001 Elsevier
Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords: Vestibulo-ocular re¯ex; Learning; Plasticity; Habituation; Cerebellum; Linear systems; Nonlinear systems; Pattern correlation
1. Introduction
The vestibulo-ocular re¯ex (VOR) is an important model
system for the study of motor learning. VOR behavior can
be modi®ed through experience in various ways. This paper

  

Source: Anastasio, Thomas J. - Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology & Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine