Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
J. Exp. Bid. (1969), 51. 443-47 With 14 uxt-figura
 

Summary: J. Exp. Bid. (1969), 51. 443-47
With 14 uxt-figura
Printed in Great Britain
STRUCTURE OF THE
RETINAE OF THE PRINCIPAL EYES OF JUMPING SPIDERS
(SALTICIDAE: DENDRYPHANTINAE) IN
RELATION TO VISUAL OPTICS
BY M. F. LAND
Department of Physiology-Anatomy, University of California,
Berkeley, California, U.S.A.
(Received 10 February 1969)
INTRODUCTION
Jumping spiders (Salticidae) are among the most vision-dependent animals. Much
of their behaviour is initiated by visual stimuli, and controlled in its course by visual
information. This behaviour includes prey-catching, courtship (which involves mate-
recognition and an elaborate display of visual signals), escape from enemies, and the
ordinary business of getting around the environment. To guide this repertoire the
animals have eight simple eyes (Fig. 1). These are divided on functional and anatomical
grounds into two groups: the principal eyes and the side eyes. The former group con-
sists of a single pair of large eyes (antero-median, AM) which have movable retinae

  

Source: Allman, John M. - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine