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ISBE Newsletter, Vol. 17(1) May 2005 Commentaries
 

Summary: ISBE Newsletter, Vol. 17(1) May 2005
16
Commentaries
A Beginner's Guide to Scientific Misconduct.
Bob Montgomerie1
and Tim Birkhead2
1
Dept of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Canada (montgome@biology.queensu.ca)
2
Dept of Animal & Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, UK (T.R.Birkhead@sheffield.ac.uk)
Scientific misconduct, like the weather, is a subject
that everyone talks about. But is scientific misconduct
a problem that we can actually do something about?
Our own discipline--behavioral and evolutionary
ecology--has certainly been abuzz with talk about
scientific misconduct for the past several years, but
when it comes to doing something about it, the usual
reaction is that "the situation is deplorable and
someone should do something about it, but not me".
Certainly at last year's ABS meeting in Oaxaca, we

  

Source: Abella, Scott R. - School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada at Las Vegas

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology