Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Signals Involved in Arabidopsis Resistance to Trichoplusia ni Caterpillars Induced by Virulent and Avirulent Strains
 

Summary: Signals Involved in Arabidopsis Resistance to Trichoplusia
ni Caterpillars Induced by Virulent and Avirulent Strains
of the Phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae1
Jianping Cui, Georg Jander2
, Lisa R. Racki, Paul D. Kim3
, Naomi E. Pierce, and Frederick M. Ausubel*
Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138
(J.C., L.R.R., P.D.K., N.E.P.); Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115
(G.J., F.M.A.); and Department of Molecular Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts
02114 (G.J., F.M.A.)
Plants have evolved different but interconnected strategies to defend themselves against herbivorous insects and microbial
pathogens. We used an Arabidopsis/Pseudomonas syringae pathosystem to investigate the impact of pathogen-induced
defense responses on cabbage looper (Trichoplusia ni) larval feeding. Arabidopsis mutants [npr1, pad4, eds5, and sid2(eds16)]
or transgenic plants (nahG) that are more susceptible to microbial pathogens and are compromised in salicylic acid
(SA)-dependent defense responses exhibited reduced levels of feeding by T. ni compared with wild-type plants. Consistent
with these results, Arabidopsis mutants that are more resistant to microbial pathogens and have elevated levels of SA (cpr1
and cpr6) exhibited enhanced levels of T. ni feeding. These experiments suggested an inverse relationship between an active
SA defense pathway and insect feeding. In contrast to these results, there was increased resistance to T. ni in wild-type
Arabidopsis ecotype Columbia plants that were infected with P. syringae pv. maculicola strain ES4326 (Psm ES4326)
expressing the avirulence genes avrRpt2 or avrB, which elicit a hypersensitive response, high levels of SA accumulation, and

  

Source: Ausubel, Frederick M. - Department of Genetics, Harvard University
Pierce, Naomi E. - Museum of Comparative Zoology & Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology