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Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol. 12, Nos. 1/2, June 2005 ( C 2005) DOI: 10.1007/s10914-005-4867-3
 

Summary: Journal of Mammalian Evolution, Vol. 12, Nos. 1/2, June 2005 ( C 2005)
DOI: 10.1007/s10914-005-4867-3
Mammalian Faunal Succession in the Cretaceous
of the Kyzylkum Desert
J. David Archibald1,3
and Alexander O. Averianov2
Both metatherians and eutherians are known from the Early Cretaceous (Barremian, 125 mya;
million years ago) of China, while eutherian-dominated mammalian faunas appeared in Asia at
least by the earliest Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian, 95 mya). The approximately 9993 my old
(Cenomanian) Sheikhdzheili l.f. from western Uzbekistan is a small sample of only eutherians,
including three zhelestids and a possible zalambdalestoid. The much better-known 90 my old
(Turonian) Bissekty l.f. at Dzharakuduk iin central Uzbekistan includes 15 named and un-
named species, based on ongoing analyses. Of these, 12 are eutherians represented by at least
the three groups--asioryctitheres, zalambdalestids, and zhelestids--plus an eutherian of uncertain
position--Paranyctoides. Zalambdalestids and zhelestids have been argued to be related to the
origin of the placental gliriforms (Euarchontoglires) and ferungulates (Laurasiatheria), respec-
tively. Although there are four previously recognized metatherians, we believe three are referable
to the deltatheroid Sulestes karakshi and the fourth, Sailestes quadrans, may belong to Paranyc-
toides. There is one multituberculate and one symmetrodont in the Bissekty l.f. While comparably
aged (Turonian) localities in North America have somewhat similar non-therians, they have more

  

Source: Archibald, J. David - Department of Biology, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Geosciences