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Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998 Old and blue white-dwarf stars
 

Summary: Nature Macmillan Publishers Ltd 1998
8
Old and blue white-dwarf stars
as a detectable source
of microlensing events
Brad M. S. Hansen
Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto,
Ontario M5S 3H8, Canada
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The analysis1
of gravitational microlensing events of stars2,3
in the
Large Magellanic Cloud places the masses of the lensing objects in
the range 0.30.8 solar masses, suggesting that they might be old
white-dwarf stars. Such objects represent the last stage of stellar
evolution: they are the cooling cores of stars that have lost their
atmospheres after nuclear fusion has ceased in their centres. If
white dwarfs exist in abundance in the halo of our Galaxy, this
would have profound implications for our understanding of the
early generations of stars in the Universe46

  

Source: Armitage, Phil - Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder

 

Collections: Physics