Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
pictorial cues (i.e., either living or nonliving things) that signaled whether subjects could earn money or not in
 

Summary: Previews
331
pictorial cues (i.e., either living or nonliving things) that
signaled whether subjects could earn money or not in
an upcoming number judgment task. After a few se-
conds' delay, subjects attempted to answer whether a
rapidly presented target number was greater than 5 be-
fore it disappeared. As in prior work, analysis of brain
data indicated that reward-predicting cues activated
Remembrance of Rewards Past
Using event-related fMRI, Wittmann and colleagues
report in this issue of Neuron that reward value en-
hances cue memory and that this process is associ-
ated with midbrain modulation of hippocampal con- subcortical structures such as the midbrain and ventral
solidation. We propose that their findings introduce a striatum.
novel mechanism by which positive arousal induced Immediately after the scan, the investigators surprised
by reward anticipation may promote memory. subjects with a memory test for the pictorial cues, fol-
lowed by another test 3 weeks later. Had reward antici-
"The past is hidden . . . beyond the reach of intellect, pation enhanced cue recognition? Apparently, but only
in some material object (in the sensation which that at the 3 week test--implicating long-term consolida-

  

Source: Adcock, R. Alison - Center for Cognitive Neuroscience & Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Duke University
Knutson, Brian - Departments of Psychology & Neurobiology, Stanford University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine