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ORIGINAL ARTICLE doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00858.x
 

Summary: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
doi:10.1111/j.1558-5646.2009.00858.x
MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR
EVIDENCE REVEALS RECENT HYBRIDIZATION
BETWEEN GORILLA TAXA
Rebecca Rogers Ackermann1,2
and Jacqueline M. Bishop3
1
Department of Archaeology, Faculty of Science, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa
2
E-mail: Becky.Ackermann@uct.ac.za
3
Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7701, South Africa
Received January 16, 2009
Accepted September 12, 2009
Molecular studies have demonstrated a deep lineage split between the two gorilla species, as well as divisions within these taxa;
estimates place this divergence in the mid-Pleistocene, with gene flow continuing until approximately 80,000 years ago. Here,
we present analyses of skeletal data indicating the presence of substantial recent gene flow among gorillas at all taxonomic
levels: between populations, subspecies, and species. Complementary analyses of DNA sequence variation suggest that low-level
migration occurred primarily in a westerly-to-easterly direction. In western gorillas, the locations of hybrid phenotypes map closely

  

Source: Ackermann, Rebecca Rogers - Department of Archaeology, University of Cape Town

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine