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PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE Research Report
 

Summary: PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE
Research Report
480 Copyright 2002 American Psychological Society VOL. 13, NO. 5, SEPTEMBER 2002
LEXICAL NEIGHBORHOODS AND THE WORD-FORM
REPRESENTATIONS OF 14-MONTH-OLDS
Daniel Swingley1
and Richard N. Aslin2
1
Max-Planck-Institute for Psycholinguistics, Nijmegen, the Netherlands, and 2
Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences,
University of Rochester
Abstract--The degree to which infants represent phonetic detail in
words has been a source of controversy in phonology and developmen-
tal psychology. One prominent hypothesis holds that infants store words
in a vague or inaccurate form until the learning of similar-sounding
neighbors forces attention to subtle phonetic distinctions. In the experi-
ment reported here, we used a visual fixation task to assess word rec-
ognition. We present the first evidence indicating that, in fact, the lexical
representations of 14- and 15-month-olds are encoded in fine detail,
even when this detail is not functionally necessary for distinguishing

  

Source: Aslin, Richard N. - Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, University of Rochester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine