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Direct Imaging and Spectroscopic Characterization of Stimulus-Responsive Syuji Fujii,*, Steven P. Armes, Tohru Araki,*, and Harald Ade
 

Summary: Direct Imaging and Spectroscopic Characterization of Stimulus-Responsive
Microgels
Syuji Fujii,*, Steven P. Armes, Tohru Araki,*, and Harald Ade
UniVersity of Sheffield, Department of Chemistry, Dainton Building, Brook Hill, Sheffield S3 7HF, United Kingdom,
and North Carolina State UniVersity, Department of Physics, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695
Received September 26, 2005; E-mail: s.fujii@sheffield.ac.uk; TAraki@lbl.gov
Microgel particles with diameters ranging from 100 nm to 1 Ám
have attracted significant attention recently.1 Such particles offer a
number of potential applications in various fields including drug
delivery,2 chemical separations,3 sensors,4 catalysis,5 dynamically
tunable microlenses,6 templates for synthesis of inorganic nano-
particles,7 water purification,8 viscosity modifiers9 and as "smart"
particulate emulsifiers.10 Stimulus-responsive microgel particles can
swell or de-swell on application of certain external "triggers" such
as pH, temperature, addition of electrolyte, etc. Microgel particles
are usually employed in their wet solvated state, and in situ
characterization of these particles under such conditions is essential
for understanding their colloidal behavior. Appropriate techniques
for characterizing solvated microgels include dynamic light scat-
tering (DLS), 1H NMR, small-angle neutron scattering and fluo-

  

Source: Ade, Harald W.- Department of Physics, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Physics