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4. Document Management in CLDC Robert Amor, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
 

Summary: 4. Document Management in CLDC
Robert Amor, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand
Mike Clift, Centre for Whole Life Performance, BRE, Watford WD25 9XX, UK
In current engineering practice, be it concurrent or otherwise, documents are the central
mechanism for communicating, informing and instructing. Any attempt to engender a greater
uptake of concurrent engineering in the industry has to recognise the central role of
documents in process reengineering. The proper management of documents has the potential
to greatly improve the design process in terms of efficiency and effectiveness. It is estimated
(by document management system developers) that professionals in the industry spend 30
percent, or more, of their time managing documentation in current paper-based management
regimes, and the source of much litigation in the industry can be tracked back to improper
management of documentation. IT-based approaches can greatly impact on document
management; however, to date the various aspects of IT applied to engineering have
developed independently, leading to stand-alone product, process and document management
systems. This development path, though productive in each individual area, misses the major
gains that can be achieved from integration of all aspects of IT usage. This chapter shows that
the proper management of documents provides information about all aspects of a project. It is
argued that, through careful management, documents can provide the means to effectively co-
ordinate work on the activities required to complete a project, and to determine how
processes can be managed to greatest effect using concurrent engineering frameworks.

  

Source: Amor, Robert - Department of Computer Science, University of Auckland

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences