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The Authors (2008). Journal compilation New Phytologist (2008) www.newphytologist.org The adaptive value of leaf
 

Summary:  The Authors (2008). Journal compilation New Phytologist (2008) www.newphytologist.org
Meetings
The adaptive value of leaf
colour
Origin and evolution of autumn colours, Oxford,
UK, March 2008
Why do leaves turn red? (Fig. 1) Such striking foliar colours
seem to mean something, but what? Many temperate species
develop red foliage in autumn. Young flush leaves in tropical
forests are also often red. Red is the colour of the lower leaf
surfaces of many understory and floating plants. Thorns and
spines are often red. Stress commonly causes foliage to blush.
Why does this happen?
A number of tribes of biologists have theorized about the
distinctive colours of leaves, and a few researchers have even
performed experiments. This has led to a range of sometimes
mutually incompatible hypotheses (Archetti, 2000; Lee &
Gould, 2002; Manetas, 2006). Marco Archetti (University of
New Phytologist (2008) 179: 913
Meetings

  

Source: Archetti, Marco - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine