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Perception, 1998, volume 27, pages 817-825 Picturing peripheral acuity
 

Summary: 1
Perception, 1998, volume 27, pages 817-825
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Picturing peripheral acuity
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Stuart Anstis
Dept of Psychology, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0109, USA;
Email: sanstis@ucsd.edu
Received 1 December 1997, in revised form 9 May 1998
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Abstract. The grain of the retina becomes progressively coarser from the fovea to the periphery. This
is caused by the decreasing number of retinal receptive fields and decreasing amount of cortex devoted
to each degree of visual field (=cortical magnification factor) as one goes into the priphery. We
stimulate this with a picture that is progressively blurred towards its edges; when strictly fixated at its
centre it looks equally sharp all over.
Foveal acuity is far better than peripheral acuity, since the structure of the retina and
cortex is designed to favour foveal in preference to peripheral stimuli. The visual field
is mapped topographically on the surface of the striate cortex in humans; the
projection is large for the central visual field and is progressively compressed toward
the periphery (Mora, Carman & Allman, 1989: Sereno, Dale, Reppas, Kwong, et al

  

Source: Anstis, Stuart - Department of Psychology, University of California at San Diego

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine