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autotrophic flagellates (220 mm), consumed by micro and mesozooplankton; picoplankton (0.22 mm), consumed by heterotrophic nanoflagellates; and inedible
 

Summary: autotrophic flagellates (220 mm), consumed by micro and mesozooplankton;
picoplankton (0.22 mm), consumed by heterotrophic nanoflagellates; and inedible
phytoplankton .20 mm. The uptake of nutrients (NO3, NH4 and PO4) have been
decoupled from the carbon assimilation processes by including dynamic nutrient
kinetics22
, whereby nutrient uptake is dependent on both the level of intercellular storage
and external nutrient concentrations. The microbial food web contains bacteria,
heterotrophic flagellates and microzooplankton, each with dynamically varying C:N:P
ratios and is described in ref. 23. Bacteria consume DOC, decompose detritus and can
compete for inorganic nutrients with phytoplankton. Heterotrophic flagellates feed on
bacteria and picoplankton and are consumed by microzooplankton and
mesozooplankton. Microzooplankton feed on diatoms, autotrophic and heterotrophic
flagellates and are consumed by mesozooplankton. Mesozooplankton feed on diatoms,
autotrophic flagellates and microzooplankton24
. All three grazer groups are cannibalistic.
Simulations were made with the ERSEM parameter sets used in ref. 15, for the Humber
plume region of the North Sea. The model was forced by heat fluxes calculated from
meteorological data observed at Dublin. Although data for Dublin are not from the North
Sea, Dublin lies directly in the path of weather systems which commonly move from the
Gulf Stream to the North Sea.

  

Source: Andersen, Richard - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine