Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Effectiveness of Journal Ranking Schemes as a Tool for Locating Information
 

Summary: Effectiveness of Journal Ranking Schemes as a Tool for
Locating Information
Michael J. Stringer1,3
, Marta Sales-Pardo2,3
, Lui´s A. Nunes Amaral2,3
*
1 Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America, 2 Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering,
Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, United States of America, 3 Northwestern Institute on Complex Systems (NICO), Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois,
United States of America
Abstract
Background: The rise of electronic publishing [1], preprint archives, blogs, and wikis is raising concerns among publishers,
editors, and scientists about the present day relevance of academic journals and traditional peer review [2]. These concerns
are especially fuelled by the ability of search engines to automatically identify and sort information [1]. It appears that
academic journals can only remain relevant if acceptance of research for publication within a journal allows readers to infer
immediate, reliable information on the value of that research.
Methodology/Principal Findings: Here, we systematically evaluate the effectiveness of journals, through the work of editors
and reviewers, at evaluating unpublished research. We find that the distribution of the number of citations to a paper published
in a given journal in a specific year converges to a steady state after a journal-specific transient time, and demonstrate that in the
steady state the logarithm of the number of citations has a journal-specific typical value. We then develop a model for the
asymptotic number of citations accrued by papers published in a journal that closely matches the data.

  

Source: Amaral, Luis A.N. - Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Northwestern University

 

Collections: Physics; Biology and Medicine