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ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 2002, 63, 677685 doi:10.1006/anbe.2001.1948, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on
 

Summary: ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, 2002, 63, 677­685
doi:10.1006/anbe.2001.1948, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on
Evolution of female colour polymorphism in damselflies:
testing the hypotheses
J. A. ANDREuS, R. A. SAuNCHEZ-GUILLEuN & A. CORDERO RIVERA
Departamento de Ecoloxi´a e Bioloxi´a Animal, Universidade de Vigo
(Received 23 June 2001; initial acceptance 2 August 2001;
final acceptance 20 October 2001; MS. number: 6971)
The existence of several female colour morphs is a conspicuous characteristic of many damselflies that
show one male-like (androchrome) and several nonmale-like (gynochrome) morphs. We tested several
adaptive hypotheses and the null model for the maintenance of female polychromatism (one andro-
chrome and two gynochromes) in the damselfly Ceriagrion tenellum. We tested the null model by
comparing the degree of genetic differentiation between the colour locus and a set of 19 neutral RAPD
loci in five populations. Our results indicate that selection is acting to maintain similar frequencies
between populations at the colour locus. Using mark­recapture techniques we found that mating success
is not dependent on female coloration. We tested the mimicry hypothesis by presenting live and dead
models to males. Dead models were highly attractive irrespective of coloration. In contrast, with live
models males could not distinguish between androchromes and other males, and were more attracted to
gynochrome females. Despite this, within populations morph frequencies remained constant over time
and mating was at random with respect to female coloration. However, there was a positive relationship

  

Source: Andrés, José - Department of Biology, University of Saskatchewan

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine