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Intracellular glyphosate translocation study and the use of grafting techniques to reveal root-shoot inputs into glyphosate resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).
 

Summary: Intracellular glyphosate translocation study and the use of grafting techniques to reveal root-
shoot inputs into glyphosate resistance in Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri).
Nehru Mantripragada
Advanced Crop and Soil Sciences Seminar
Friday, April 14, 2011 at 3:35 pm
Miller Plant Sciences Building, Room 2401
Glyphosate resistant Palmer amaranth (Amaranthus palmeri) is now present in over sixty
counties in Georgia. Research was conducted to examine the possibility of reduced intracellular
translocation of 14
C-glyphosate into chloroplasts of glyphosate resistant (GR) Palmer amaranth
leaves and apical meristem tissue compared to identical organs from glyphosate susceptible (GS)
plants. Radioactivity was measured from extracted chloroplasts of leaves and shoot meristem to
study glyphosate translocation. The amount of chloroplast recovered from treatments was much
better at 3 and 6 hours than at 24 hours after treatment (HAT). Less translocation was noticed in
the GS leaves at 3 HAT than the leaves of GR plants but was similar at 6 and 24 HAT.
Conversely, less labeled 14
C - glyphosate was found in the GR meristem at 3 HAT and was still
25% less than GS meristem tissue at 6 HAT. These results are comparable to data obtained in
similar experiments in other GR species (Preston, et al., 2009). Though EPSPS gene
amplification was recently found to be the reason behind glyphosate resistance (Gaines, et al.,

  

Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia

 

Collections: Biotechnology