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Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548 Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three
 

Summary: Fusion Engineering and Design 42 (1998) 537548
Chamber technology concepts for inertial fusion energy--three
recent examples
Wayne R. Meier a,
*, Ralph W. Moir a
, Mohamed A. Abdou b
a
Lawrence Li6ermore National Laboratory, Li6ermore, CA 94551, USA
b
Uni6ersity of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Abstract
The most serious challenges in the design of chambers for inertial fusion energy (IFE) are: (1) protecting the first
wall from fusion energy pulses on the order of several hundred megajoules released in the form of X-rays, target
debris, and high energy neutrons; and (2) operating the chamber at a pulse repetition rate of 510 Hz (i.e.
re-establishing the wall protection and chamber conditions needed for beam propagation to the target between
pulses). In meeting these challenges, designers have capitalized on the ability to separate the fusion burn physics from
the geometry and environment of the fusion chamber. Most recent conceptual designs use gases or flowing liquids
inside the chamber. Thin liquid layers of molten salt or metal and low pressure, high-Z gases can protect the first wall
from X-rays and target debris, while thick liquid layers have the added benefit of protecting structures from fusion
neutrons thereby significantly reducing the radiation damage and activation. The use of thick liquid walls is predicted

  

Source: Abdou, Mohamed - Fusion Science and Technology Center, University of California at Los Angeles

 

Collections: Plasma Physics and Fusion