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Adler FR & Mosquera Losada J (2002). Super-and Coinfection: Filling the Range. In: Adaptive Dynamics of Infectious Diseases: In Pursuit of Virulence Management, eds. Dieckmann U, Metz JAJ, Sabelis MW &
 

Summary: Adler FR & Mosquera Losada J (2002). Super- and Coinfection: Filling the Range. In: Adaptive Dynamics
of Infectious Diseases: In Pursuit of Virulence Management, eds. Dieckmann U, Metz JAJ, Sabelis MW &
Sigmund K, pp. 138149. Cambridge University Press. c International Institute for Applied
Systems Analysis
10
Super- and Coinfection: Filling the Range
Frederick R. Adler and Julio Mosquera Losada
10.1 Introduction
How many different strains of a disease can coexist in a single population of hosts?
What effect do different mechanisms of coexistence have on the properties of dis-
eases? The principle of competitive exclusion (Armstrong and McGehee 1980;
Levin 1970) states that no more species can coexist in a system than the number
of resources or limiting factors allow, which can be thought of, somewhat impre-
cisely, as stating that a single trade-off can support only a single species the one
that deals best with that trade-off. Disease models describe a simple ecological
interaction, with hosts acting as resources, to test the limits of competitive exclu-
sion. Trade-offs for the disease often involve virulence, a trait of abiding interest
to hosts.
In the absence of a trade-off between host mortality and transmission efficiency,
the disease strain with the lowest virulence would always win out in competi-

  

Source: Adler, Fred - Department of Mathematics, University of Utah

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology