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The research described in this thesis is focused on the combination of orthogonal supramolecular interactions for functional monolayer architectures on surfaces. The term
 

Summary: Summary
The research described in this thesis is focused on the combination of orthogonal
supramolecular interactions for functional monolayer architectures on surfaces. The term
"orthogonal supramolecular interactions" refers to non-covalent interactions that do not
influence each other's assembly properties when applied in the same system. Orthogonal self-
assembly allows extended control over the self-assembly process and promotes new materials
properties. Individual noncovalent interactions (e.g. hydrogen bonding, metal coordination,
electrostatic or host-guest interactions) have been employed in many studies. However, the
combination of different supramolecular interactions in the same system can improve the
properties of the materials. The research described in this thesis aims to develop hybrid,
multifunctional monolayers by using orthogonal supramolecular interactions, enabling the
control over the monolayer composition and functionality. Orthogonal host-guest and
lanthanide-ligand coordination interaction motifs have been employed to create
supramolecular luminescent monolayers in the first part of the thesis (Chapters 3 to 5). The
second part of the thesis (Chapters 6 and 7) deals with the fabrication of functional
monolayers on silicon and gold substrates for applications in electronics.
A general introduction has been given in Chapter 1 which addresses the importance
of non-covalent interactions for the fabrication of functional surfaces.
A literature overview has been given in Chapter 2 on the use of supramolecular
interactions for the generation of hybrid assemblies and materials. Supramolecular chemistry

  

Source: Al Hanbali, Ahmad - Department of Applied Mathematics, Universiteit Twente

 

Collections: Engineering