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Genetica 112113: 3343, 2001. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.
 

Summary: Genetica 112113: 3343, 2001.
2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.
33
Possible consequences of genes of major effect: transient changes in the
G-matrix
Aneil F. Agrawal1,2, Edmund D. Brodie III1,2, & Loren H. Rieseberg1
1Department of Biology, Indiana University, 1001 E. 3rd street, Bloomington, IN 47405-3700, USA; 2Center for
the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405-3700, USA; Author for
correspondence (Phone: 812-855-8250; Fax: 812-855-6705; E-mail: edb3@bio.indiana.edu)
Key words: genes of major effect, G-matrix constancy, QTL analysis, quantitative genetics
Abstract
Understanding the process of evolutionary divergence requires knowledge of the strength, form, and targets of
selection, as well as the genetic architecture of the divergent traits. Quantitative genetic approaches to understand-
ing multivariate selection and genetic response to selection have proven to be powerful tools in this endeavor,
particularly with respect to short-term evolution. However, the application of quantitative genetic theory over
periods of substantial phenotypic change is controversial because it requires that the requisite genetic parameters
remain constant over the period of time in question. We show herein how attempts to determine the stability of
key genetic parameters may be misled by the `many genes of small effect' type of genetic architecture generally
assumed in quantitative genetics. The presence of genes of major effect (GOMEs) can alter the genetic variance-
covariance matrix dramatically for brief periods of time, significantly alter the rate and trajectory of multivariate

  

Source: Agrawal, Aneil F. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto
Brodie III, Edmund D. - Department of Biology, University of Virginia
Rieseberg, Loren - Department of Botany, University of British Columbia

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology