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Ecology, 82(1), 2001, pp. 245257 2001 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 245
Ecology, 82(1), 2001, pp. 245257
2001 by the Ecological Society of America
PREDATOR RESPONSES, PREY REFUGES, AND DENSITY-DEPENDENT
MORTALITY OF A MARINE FISH
TODD W. ANDERSON1
Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Marine Biology and the Marine Science Institute,
University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-6150 USA
Abstract. Detection of density dependence in animal populations is a primary goal of
population ecology, and the processes causing density dependence play a major role in
population regulation. Predation can strongly regulate populations by populational and
behavioral responses of predators to their prey. Here I evaluate the existence and strength
of density-dependent mortality in local populations of a reef fish, the kelp perch (Bra-
chyistius frenatus), caused by its predator, the kelp bass (Paralabrax clathratus). Specifi-
cally, I examine both the functional response and a potential aggregative response by kelp
bass as mechanisms underlying predator-induced density-dependent mortality.
I calculated the per capita mortality of kelp perch as a result of the functional response
of its predator by subjecting a range of densities of kelp perch to a low, constant number
of kelp bass and different amounts of giant kelp (Macrocystis pyrifera) as habitat structure
and a potential prey refuge. The potential for an aggregative response by kelp bass was

  

Source: Anderson, Todd - Department of Biology, San Diego State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology