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Environmental and Fxperimental Botany, Vol. 20, pp. 251 to 257 0098-8472/80/0801-0251 $02.00/0 ~) Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain
 

Summary: Environmental and Fxperimental Botany, Vol. 20, pp. 251 to 257 0098-8472/80/0801-0251 $02.00/0
~) Pergamon Press Ltd. 1980. Printed in Great Britain
UPTAKE OF ATMOSPHERIC AMMONIA BY
SELECTED PLANT SPECIES
HUGO H. ROGERS* and VINEY P. ANEJAt
*Agricultural Research, Science and Education Administration, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture,
Department of Botany, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27650,
U.S.A. ]Environmental Sciences Center, Northrop Services, Inc., Research Triangle Park,
North Carolina 27709, U.S.A.
(Received 22 March 1979; accepted in revisedform 1 December 1979)
ROGERS H. H. and ANEJA V. P. Uptake of atmospheric ammonia by selected plant species.
ENVIRONMENTALAND EXPERIMENTALBOTANY20, 251--257, 1980.--Rates of NH 3 uptake were
measured for 10 crop species by direct kinetic techniques. A continuous stirred tank reactor
(CSTR) system designed for plant gas exchange studies was used in the NH 3 exposures.
Ammonia was monitored with an analyzer that permitted real time measurement of
atmospheric NH 3 down to 5 ppb. This permitted measurement of dynamic sorption of NH 3 at
concentrations much closer to ambient levels than previously reported. Uptake rates increased
with increasing light, temperature, and NH 3 concentration. An inverse correlation was
observed between total diffusion resistance of leaves and NH 3 sorption. Rates did not vary
significantlywith repeated exposure or wkh changes in growth media N.

  

Source: Aneja, Viney P. - Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, North Carolina State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences