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Marker stability throughout 400 days of in vitro hyphal growth in the filamentous ascomycete, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
 

Summary: Marker stability throughout 400 days of in vitro hyphal growth
in the filamentous ascomycete, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum
Linda M. Kohn a,*, Michelle R. Schaffer a
, James B. Anderson a
, Niklaus J. Grunwald b
a
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 3359 Mississauga Road North, Mississauga, ON, Canada L5L 1C6
b
Horticultural Crops Research Laboratory, USDA ARS, 3420 NW Orchard Avenue, Corvallis, OR 97330, USA
Received 27 July 2007; accepted 27 September 2007
Abstract
The stability of routinely used, population genetic markers through approximately 1 year of continuous laboratory growth was inves-
tigated in the common, plant pathogentic ascomycete Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Given reports of accelerated mutation rates at higher tem-
peratures, both a permissive temperature, 22 C, and a temperature at the high end of tolerance, 30 C, were employed. Because mycelial
growth rate was tracked among mitotic lineages established for each strain, a subsidiary objective was addressed, testing the stability of a
30 C-competent phenotype. Twelve laboratory strains of S. sclerotiorum, including the genome sequence isolate, 1980, were propagated
serially for up to 400 days at 22 C. Five of these strains were also propagated at 30 C. No mutations were observed in mycelial com-
patibility groupings (MCGs), DNA fingerprints, alleles at 7 microsatellite loci, or alleles at 56 AFLP loci. All of these markers show
variation in field populations, which are likely much larger and influenced by different and more stochastic environmental processes.
In S. sclerotiorum, population genetic markers were stable over time through serial transfer and growth of laboratory strains at both

  

Source: Anderson, James B. - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology