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732 nature neuroscience volume 1 no 8 december 1998 As we move through the environment, the projected positions
 

Summary: 732 nature neuroscience volume 1 no 8 december 1998
articles
As we move through the environment, the projected positions
of objects in the image formed on the retina change in predictable
ways. For example, if we walk or drive in a straight line, our self-
motion produces a radial pattern of motion in the retinal image
(Fig. 1a). The direction toward the center or focus of the radial
expansion corresponds to our direction of motion1. Recreating
this pattern of retinal-image motion by viewing a film or com-
puter display depicting our forward motion can cause a com-
pelling sensation that we are in fact moving forward2, and under
a variety of conditions we can accurately estimate where we are
going in the simulated scene3,4.
When we smoothly shift gaze direction by turning the eyes
or head (for example, to look at a moving object or at a sta-
tionary object to the side) while still moving in a straight line,
the pattern of retinal-image motion is more complex (Fig. 1b).
We can recreate this type of retinal motion pattern by having
observers hold the eye still while monocularly viewing a dis-
play that simulates both their forward motion and an eye

  

Source: Andersen, Richard - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology
Shenoy, Krishna V. - Neurosciences Program & Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Engineering