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The Camera Convergence Problem Revisited Robert S. Allison, Department of Computer Science and Centre for Vision Research, York
 

Summary: The Camera Convergence Problem Revisited
Robert S. Allison, Department of Computer Science and Centre for Vision Research, York
University, 4700 Keele St., Toronto, Ontario, Canada M3J 1P3, allison@cs.yorku.ca
ABSTRACT
Convergence of the real or virtual stereoscopic cameras is an important operation in stereoscopic display systems. For
example, convergence can shift the range of portrayed depth to improve visual comfort; can adjust the disparity of
targets to bring them nearer to the screen and reduce accommodation-vergence conflict; or can bring objects of interest
into the binocular field-of-view. Although camera convergence is acknowledged as a useful function, there has been
considerable debate over the transformation required. It is well known that rotational camera convergence or `toe-in'
distorts the images in the two cameras producing patterns of horizontal and vertical disparities that can cause problems
with fusion of the stereoscopic imagery. Behaviourally, similar retinal vertical disparity patterns are known to correlate
with viewing distance and strongly affect perception of stereoscopic shape and depth. There has been little analysis of
the implications of recent findings on vertical disparity processing for the design of stereoscopic camera and display
systems. We ask how such distortions caused by camera convergence affect the ability to fuse and perceive stereoscopic
images.
Keywords: Stereoscopic display, vergence, vertical disparity, stereoscope, disparity, stereoscopic camera, distortion,
depth, fusion, viewing comfort
1. INTRODUCTION
In many stereoscopic viewing situations it is necessary to adjust the screen disparity of the displayed images for viewer
comfort, to optimize depth perception or to otherwise enhance the stereoscopic experience. Convergence of the real or

  

Source: Allison, Robert - Department of Computer Science, York University (Toronto)

 

Collections: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences; Biology and Medicine