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2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved. Evolution, 60(6), 2006, pp. 12421253
 

Summary: 1242
2006 The Society for the Study of Evolution. All rights reserved.
Evolution, 60(6), 2006, pp. 1242­1253
EFFECTS OF NATURAL AND SEXUAL SELECTION ON ADAPTIVE POPULATION
DIVERGENCE AND PREMATING ISOLATION IN A DAMSELFLY
ERIK I. SVENSSON,1 FABRICE EROUKHMANOFF,1,2 AND MAGNE FRIBERG1,3
1Section for Animal Ecology, Ecology Building, Lund University, SE-223 62 Lund, Sweden
E-mail: erik.svensson@zooekol.lu.se
2De´partement de Biochimie-Ge´nie Biologique Ecole Normale Supe´rieure de Cachan, 61 Avenue du Pre´sident Wilson,
94235 Cachan, Cedex, France
E-mail: fabrice.eroukhmanoff@zooekol.lu.se
3Department of Zoology, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden
E-mail: magne.friberg@zoologi.su.se
Abstract. The relative strength of different types of directional selection has seldom been compared directly in natural
populations. A recent meta-analysis of phenotypic selection studies in natural populations suggested that directional
sexual selection may be stronger in magnitude than directional natural selection, although this pattern may have partly
been confounded by the different time scales over which selection was estimated. Knowledge about the strength of
different types of selection is of general interest for understanding how selective forces affect adaptive population
divergence and how they may influence speciation. We studied divergent selection on morphology in parapatric, natural
damselfly (Calopteryx splendens) populations. Sexual selection was stronger than natural selection measured on the

  

Source: Agrell, Jep - Department of Ecology, Lunds Universitet
Svensson, Erik - Department of Ecology, Lunds Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology