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The information herein describes typical occupations and employers associated with this major. Understand that some of the options listed below may require additional training.
 

Summary: 8/10
The information herein describes typical occupations and employers associated with this major.
Understand that some of the options listed below may require additional training.
Moreover, you are not limited to these options alone when choosing a possible career path
Description of Major
The value of the food processing industry is about a hundred billion dollars in the United States alone, a value that is
approximately four times larger than the next largest manufacturing industry. There is a constant demand for college graduates, both
men and women, with training in food science and technology. This demand is created by the high percentage of foods marketed in
processed form rather than as fresh or raw products. Improvements and new developments are the lifeblood of the American
competitive system. Consequently, the food and related industries, such as the packaging industry, employ many food technologists.
The Department of Food Science and Technology offers both undergraduate and graduate instruction designed to give basic
and technical training in preparation for work in such industries as meat and poultry processing, canning, freezing, pickling,
preserving, and the preparation and preservation of specialty food products.
Possible Job Titles of Food Science Graduates
(*As reported by UGA Career Center post-graduate survey)
Account Representative
Applications Research and Technical
Services Manager*
Associate Research Scientist*
Brand Development

  

Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia

 

Collections: Biotechnology