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APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2008, p. 59655974 Vol. 74, No. 19 0099-2240/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.00741-08
 

Summary: APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2008, p. 59655974 Vol. 74, No. 19
0099-2240/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.00741-08
Copyright 2008, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
The Obligate Mutualist Wigglesworthia glossinidia Influences
Reproduction, Digestion, and Immunity Processes of Its
Host, the Tsetse Fly
Roshan Pais, Claudia Lohs, Yineng Wu, Jingwen Wang, and Serap Aksoy*
Yale School of Public Heath, Department of Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases, New Haven, Connecticut 06520
Received 28 March 2008/Accepted 4 August 2008
Tsetse flies (Diptera: Glossinidae) are vectors for trypanosome parasites, the agents of the deadly sleeping
sickness disease in Africa. Tsetse also harbor two maternally transmitted enteric mutualist endosymbionts: the
primary intracellular obligate Wigglesworthia glossinidia and the secondary commensal Sodalis glossinidius. Both
endosymbionts are transmitted to the intrauterine progeny through the milk gland secretions of the viviparous
female. We administered various antibiotics either continuously by per os supplementation of the host blood
meal diet or discretely by hemocoelic injections into fertile females in an effort to selectively eliminate the
symbionts to study their individual functions. A symbiont-specific PCR amplification assay and fluorescence
in situ hybridization analysis were used to evaluate symbiont infection outcomes. Tetracycline and rifampin
treatments eliminated all tsetse symbionts but reduced the fecundity of the treated females. Ampicillin
treatments did not affect the intracellular Wigglesworthia localized in the bacteriome organ and retained female
fecundity. The resulting progeny of ampicillin-treated females, however, lacked Wigglesworthia but still har-

  

Source: Aksoy, Serap - School of Public Health, Yale University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine