Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
nature geoscience | VOL 3 | NOVEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 1 correspondence
 

Summary: nature geoscience | VOL 3 | NOVEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 1
correspondence
To the Editor -- The calculations offered
by Quinton et al.1
raise the unfortunate
notion that soil erosion generates an
unintentional benefit for climate, owing to
the long-term burial of soil organic carbon.
But limiting the assessment of the impact
of soil erosion on climate change to organic
carbon burial ignores, apart from economic
and social damages, the coupling between
biogeochemical cycles. For example, the
eroded nitrogen has to be replaced, at least
in part by artificial fertilizers, to maintain
soil fertility. At this point the carbon and
nitrogen cycles meet, because the production
of fertilizer generates greenhouse gases; the
production of one ton of fertilizer in the
United States generates more than 850 kg of

  

Source: Amrhein, Valentin - Zoologisches Institut, Universitšt Basel

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology