Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
471Ambio Vol. 31 No. 6, Sept. 2002 Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2002 http://www.ambio.kva.se
 

Summary: 471Ambio Vol. 31 No. 6, Sept. 2002 © Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2002
http://www.ambio.kva.se
INTRODUCTION
Carbon in the form of CO2 is accumulating in the atmosphere
at a rate of about 3.5 gigatonnes (Gt) per year (Gt yr­1
) as a re-
sult of combustion of fossil fuel, tropical deforestation and other
land-use changes. Scientific as well as political consensus now
seems to have been reached regarding the risk of dangerous in-
terference with the climate, and is expressed in the UN Frame-
work Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC) (1). At the same
time, desertification and land degradation continues to cause pov-
erty and misery to millions of people in the drylands of the de-
veloping world. For combating desertification and to alleviate
poverty in the affected regions, the UN Convention to Combat
Desertification (UNCCD) strives to implement activities aimed
at promoting sustainable development. Desertification and land
degradation also pose a threat to the biodiversity of many mar-
ginal lands, which is one of the foci of the UN Convention on
Biodiversity (UNCBD). It is important to acknowledge that in

  

Source: Ardö, Jonas - Department of Earth and Ecosystem Sciences, Lunds Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology; Geosciences