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The baroreflex, or pressure reflex, is the primary mechanism in adult vertebrates for rapid regulation of arterial pressure
 

Summary: The baroreflex, or pressure reflex, is the primary mechanism
in adult vertebrates for rapid regulation of arterial pressure
through changes in heart rate and peripheral resistance. Such
a mechanism is important for buffering fluctuations in arterial
pressure, to maintain tissue perfusion pressure and, ultimately,
to supply metabolic fuels to the end-organs (Van Vliet and
West, 1994). While the functional significance of the
baroreflex is clear in adult organisms, the importance of this
reflex during embryonic or fetal development is less clarified.
The two primary species used to study vertebrate
cardiovascular development, sheep and chickens, both possess
a functional baroreflex during fetal or embryonic life (Blanco
et al., 1988; Segar, 1992; Altimiras and Crossley, 2000). This
suggests that either the baroreflex is an important component
of cardiovascular regulation during development or that it
simply becomes functional in anticipation of its neonatal
utility. Work in embryonic chickens suggests the latter, given
that barostatic reflexes emerge very late in development and
have a lower gain compared with those in adults (Altimiras and
Crossley, 2000). By contrast, fetal sheep possess a baroreflex

  

Source: Altimiras, Jordi - Department of Biology, Linköpings Universitet

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology