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Apple Burrknot Borers in New York Revisited Pest status and chemical control of borers infesting apple burrknots in New York State
 

Summary: Apple Burrknot Borers in New York ­ Revisited
Pest status and chemical control of borers infesting apple burrknots in New York State
DAVID P. KAIN, RICHARD W. STRAUB AND ARTHUR M. AGNELLO
Department of Entomology, New York State Agricultural Experiment Station, Geneva, NY 14456
ABSTRACT After reports of severe damage to dwarf apple trees caused by American plum borer,
a survey was conducted in the major apple growing regions of New York State to determine the
incidence of borers infesting burrknots on clonal apple rootstocks. Dogwood borer was prevalent
throughout the state, in general. However, in western NY apple orchards, American plum borer
was sometimes more numerous in those that had mouseguards and were near infested stone fruit
trees. Insecticides tested were, 2000: chlorpyrifos at various timings; 2001: chlorpyrifos, white
latex paint alone or mixed with chlorpyrifos, endosulfan and indoxacarb; postharvest 2001 and
prebloom 2002: chlorpyrifos , and 2002: methoxyfenozide, kaolin clay, fenpropathrin, and
indoxacarb. Chlorpyrifos, fenpropathrin and indoxacarb were effective. Early-season
(prebloom­petal fall) applications of chlorpyrifos provided season-long control of both pests.
BURRKNOTS ARE AGGREGATIONS of root initials that can develop on the above-ground
portion of all commercial dwarfing and semi-dwarfing clonal rootstocks. Burrknots serve as an
initial point of entry for dogwood borer (Synanthedon scitula) and American plum borer (Euzophera
semifuneralis), as newly hatched larvae bore into the tissue between the root initials and commence
feeding. An earlier survey in western New York and the Hudson Valley (Riedl et.al. 1985) revealed
that 70% of trees on dwarfing or semi-dwarfing rootstocks had burrknots and that an average of 30%

  

Source: Agnello, Arthur M. - Department of Entomology, Cornell University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine