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Anim. Behav., 1995, 50, 623-633 Behavioural variation in natural populations. VII. Maternal body temperature
 

Summary: Anim. Behav., 1995, 50, 623-633
Behavioural variation in natural populations. VII. Maternal body temperature
does not affect juvenile thermoregulation in a garter snake
STEVAN J. ARNOLD, CHARLES R. PETERSON & JEAN GLADSTONE
Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago
(Received 14 July 1993; initial acceptance 30 September 1993;
jinal acceptance 8 December 1994; MS. number: ~6751~)
Abstract. This study was aimed to determine whether thermoregulation by juvenile garter snakes is
affected by developmental temperature imposed by their mothers during pregnancy. Maternal temperature
treatments were created by maintaining six groups of females at six different constant temperatures
(2632C) during pregnancy. A seventh group of females was allowed to thermoregulate during pregnancy.
The body temperatures of juveniles (N=324) on thermal gradients were monitored in the morning and
afternoon for 5 consecutive days, beginning 5 days after birth. The body temperatures of juveniles were
consistent, apparently heritable and remarkably stereotyped. Juvenile body temperature was virtually
unaffected by maternal temperature treatment 0 1995 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour
Behaviour is the principal regulator of body
temperature in reptiles, with physiological adjust-
ments playing a secondary role (Bartholomew
1982). Many reptiles achieve relatively precise
thermoregulation by behavioural choice of micro-

  

Source: Arnold, Stevan J. - Department of Zoology, Oregon State University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology