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MEDIA CONTACT: Lisa De Nike (443) 287-9960
 

Summary: MEDIA CONTACT: Lisa De Nike
(443) 287-9960
Lde@jhu.edu
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EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE ON TUESDAY, JAN. 11, AT 2 P.M. PST
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ASTRONOMERS TAKE REVEALING PEEK AT STAR FACTORY
Observations eventually expected lead to increased understanding of interstellar dust and gas
Using NASA's orbiting Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, a team of astronomers
from The Johns Hopkins University and elsewhere has taken an unprecedented peek beneath the
"skirts" of the tunic-clad Orion the Hunter and come away with observations that may lead to
enhanced knowledge of how interstellar dust absorbs and scatters ultraviolet starlight.
"Understanding interstellar dust is important. After all, this is the stuff out of which,
ultimately, planets, stars and even people, are made," said team member Richard Conn Henry, a
professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins.
Henry will present findings from the research on Jan. 11 during the American Astronomical
Society's meeting in San Diego.
The constellation Orion, named for its resemblance to a powerful, tunic-clad hunter
wielding a club and sword, is probably the greatest star factory in our galaxy, with thousands of
young, hot, blue stars emerging from its great clouds of gas and dust. Led by Jayant Murthy of

  

Source: Henry, Richard C.- Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University

 

Collections: Physics