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Slow recovery of soil biodiversity in sandy loam soils of Georgia after 25 years of no-tillage management
 

Summary: Slow recovery of soil biodiversity in sandy loam soils of Georgia
after 25 years of no-tillage management
Sina M. Adl a,*, David C. Coleman b
, Frederick Read c
a
Department of Biology, Dalhousie University, 1355 Oxford Street, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 4J1
b
Institute of Ecology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2360, United States
c
University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service, Douglas, GA 31533, United States
Received 20 April 2004; received in revised form 7 November 2005; accepted 16 November 2005
Available online 19 January 2006
Abstract
There is little data on the time required for recovery of soil species richness from disturbance such as tillage. We identified commercial no-
till fields that represented a chronosequence of 425 years of reduced disturbance at the start of the study. These were compared to adjacent
fields in conventional tillage as regularly disturbed reference sites. Five cotton fields in southern Georgia sandy loam soils were sampled four
times over 2 years to determine the abundance of soil organisms at each site. Our results show an increase in organic matter content, profile
stratification, and diversity of morphotypes within samples, with age in no-tillage management. Some groups of organisms responded more
quickly to the no-till management, while most increase in diversity over several years. However, abundance values for each taxonomic
category was not always significant. We also identified a pattern between our Spring and Fall samples for microbial biomass, organic carbon

  

Source: Adl, Sina - Department of Biology, Dalhousie University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology