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2751RESEARCH ARTICLE INTRODUCTION
 

Summary: 2751RESEARCH ARTICLE
INTRODUCTION
Planar polarity refers to the ability of cells to `know' directional
information and to share this information with adjacent cells.
Polarity effectors in each cell use that information for many
different outputs, including oriented division, directed cell
movements and the formation of polarized cell shapes. Together,
these outputs enable the many cells that comprise a single tissue to
coordinate morphogenic movements.
Genetic experiments in Drosophila have been used to identify
core planar polarity genes (Vinson and Adler, 1987; Adler et al.,
1998). These genes collaborate to produce, amplify and stabilize
the initial orienting vector, and thus are required for polarity in
many tissues. By their genetic and physical interactions these genes
can be grouped into two sets, here called the Frizzled system and
the Dachsous system (Axelrod, 2009). It should be noted that, in
each system, some of the constituent genes also have roles distinct
from their contribution to planar polarity. For example, members
of the Dachsous system are important for growth control, whereas
members of the Frizzled system participate in canonical Wnt

  

Source: Alwes, Frederike - Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine