Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Influence of Gaze Rotation on the Visual Response of Primate MSTd Neurons
 

Summary: Influence of Gaze Rotation on the Visual Response of Primate
MSTd Neurons
KRISHNA V. SHENOY, DAVID C. BRADLEY, AND RICHARD A. ANDERSEN
Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125
Shenoy, Krishna V., David C. Bradley, and Richard A. Andersen.
Influence of gaze rotation on the visual response of primate MSTd
neurons. J. Neurophysiol. 81: 27642786, 1999. When we move
forward, the visual image on our retina expands. Humans rely on the
focus, or center, of this expansion to estimate their direction of
heading and, as long as the eyes are still, the retinal focus corresponds
to the heading. However, smooth rotation of the eyes adds nearly
uniform visual motion to the expanding retinal image and causes a
displacement of the retinal focus. In spite of this, humans accurately
judge their heading during pursuit eye movements and during active,
smooth head rotations even though the retinal focus no longer corre-
sponds to the heading. Recent studies in macaque suggest that cor-
rection for pursuit may occur in the dorsal aspect of the medial
superior temporal area (MSTd) because these neurons are tuned to the
retinal position of the focus and they modify their tuning during
pursuit to compensate partially for the focus shift. However, the

  

Source: Andersen, Richard - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology
Shenoy, Krishna V. - Neurosciences Program & Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Engineering