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Research Papers Abnormal brain chemistry in chronic back pain: an in vivo proton
 

Summary: Research Papers
Abnormal brain chemistry in chronic back pain: an in vivo proton
magnetic resonance spectroscopy study
Igor D. Gracheva,b,*, Bruce E. Fredricksonc
, A. Vania Apkariana,b
a
Department of Neurosurgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
b
Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
c
Department of Orthopedic Surgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY 13210, USA
Received 18 January 2000; received in revised form 19 April 2000; accepted 2 May 2000
Abstract
The neurobiology of chronic pain, including chronic back pain, is unknown. Structural imaging studies of the spine cannot explain all
cases of chronic back pain. Functional brain imaging studies indicate that the brain activation patterns are different between chronic pain
patients and normal subjects, and the thalamus, and prefrontal and cingulate cortices are involved in some types of chronic pain. Animal
models of chronic pain suggest abnormal spinal cord chemistry. Does chronic pain cause brain chemistry changes? We examined brain
chemistry changes in patients with chronic back pain using in vivo single- voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1
H-MRS). In vivo
1

  

Source: Apkarian, A. Vania - Department of Physiology, Northwestern University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine