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ICES Journal of Marine Science, 59: 458468. 2002 doi:10.1006/jmsc.2002.1196, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on
 

Summary: ICES Journal of Marine Science, 59: 458468. 2002
doi:10.1006/jmsc.2002.1196, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on
Spatially explicit dispersal dynamics and equilibrium population
sizes in marine harvest refuges
Charles A. Acosta
Acosta, C. A. 2002. Spatially explicit dispersal dynamics and equilibrium population
sizes in marine harvest refuges. ICES Journal of Marine Science, 59: 458468.
For marine reserves to function as effective harvest refuges for exploited species, the
reserve must protect a substantial proportion of the population for an indefinite period
of time. Because most marine reserves are space-limited, the buildup and equilibrium
population sizes of mobile species will be influenced by the size and boundary
conditions of the refuge. A logistic rate model was used to predict equilibrium
population sizes in a marine harvest refuge, based on species-specific dispersal
dynamics and the spatial configuration of the refuge. The model parameters were
derived for Caribbean spiny lobsters and queen conch in an isolated marine reserve at
Glover's Reef, Belize, and were compared to observed population change over a 5-yr
period. Spiny lobsters and queen conch, the two most heavily exploited species in the
Caribbean, differ in larval recruitment rates (immigration) and mobility of adults
(emigration). The expected increase in the population size of spiny lobsters in this
refuge was 250% and queen conch was 420% over that of the initial fished population.

  

Source: Acosta, Charles A. - Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Kentucky University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology