Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
Ecology, 85(8), 2004, pp. 21182133 2004 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 2118
Ecology, 85(8), 2004, pp. 21182133
2004 by the Ecological Society of America
RESISTANCE AND SUSCEPTIBILITY OF MILKWEED: COMPETITION,
ROOT HERBIVORY, AND PLANT GENETIC VARIATION
ANURAG A. AGRAWAL1
Department of Botany, 25 Willcocks Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2
Abstract. Beetles in the genus Tetraopes share a long evolutionary history with milk-
weeds (Asclepias spp.), feeding on roots as larvae and leaves as adults. Despite their extreme
specialization on milkweed, Tetraopes require drying grass stems as oviposition sites, even
though they do not consume grass. The natural history of the interaction suggests that
herbivory may be likely only when milkweeds are in close proximity to grasses. Theory
also predicts that two stresses on plants, competition and herbivory, may have non-additive
negative impacts on correlates of fitness. In field experiments conducted over two years, I
followed the consequences of grass competition and beetle attack for herbivory, growth,
and reproduction of milkweed, and reciprocal effects of milkweed on grass in common
gardens. To assess the effect of milkweed traits on beetles, I conducted a quantitative
genetic experiment using full-sibling families of milkweed and measured the effects of
putative resistance traits on the abundance of Tetraopes adults. Milkweeds growing next
to grass were initially unaffected in growth but suffered 10% greater leaf herbivory by

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology