Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
American Journal of Botany 98(1): 109121. 2011. American Journal of Botany 98(1): 109121, 2011; http://www.amjbot.org/ 2011 Botanical Society of America
 

Summary: 109
American Journal of Botany 98(1): 109121. 2011.
American Journal of Botany 98(1): 109121, 2011; http://www.amjbot.org/ 2011 Botanical Society of America
Landscape features interact with life history traits to either
enhance or truncate gene flow in ways that are not always pre-
dictable. The pattern and degree of population divergence will
depend largely on realized gene flow (Slatkin, 1985), which in
plants is determined by the composition, configuration, and ma-
trix quality of the landscapes they inhabit (Manel et al., 2003;
Storfer et al., 2007; Holderegger and Wagner, 2008), as well as
life history traits such as pollination system and dispersal sys-
tem (Hamrick and Godt, 1996; Richards, 1997; Duminil et al.,
2007). In animal-pollinated plants, landscape connectivity and
pollinator movement can affect population genetic structure in
unpredictable ways. For example, in two herbaceous species,
Lantana camara (butterfly pollinated) and Rudbeckia hirta (hy-
menoptera pollinated), greater habitat connectivity predictably
enhanced gene flow by facilitating greater pollinator movement
among populations, decreasing population genetic divergence
(Townsend and Levey, 2005). However, in the tropical forest

  

Source: Ashley, Mary V. - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Illinois at Chicago

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology