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INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 2004, p. 53315339 Vol. 72, No. 9 0019-9567/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/IAI.72.9.53315339.2004
 

Summary: INFECTION AND IMMUNITY, Sept. 2004, p. 53315339 Vol. 72, No. 9
0019-9567/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/IAI.72.9.53315339.2004
Copyright 2004, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Dendritic Cells Induce Immunity and Long-Lasting Protection against
Blood-Stage Malaria despite an In Vitro Parasite-Induced
Maturation Defect
Dodie S. Pouniotis, Owen Proudfoot, Violeta Bogdanoska, Vasso Apostolopoulos,
Theodora Fifis, and Magdalena Plebanski*
Vaccine and Infectious Diseases Unit, The Austin Research Institute, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Received 23 December 2003/Returned for modification 3 February 2004/Accepted 16 March 2004
Dendritic cells (DC) suffer a maturation defect following interaction with erythrocytes infected with malaria
parasites and become unable to induce protective malaria liver-stage immunity. Here we show that, by contrast,
maturation-arrested DC in vitro are capable of the successful induction of antigen-specific gamma interferon
(IFN- ) and interleukin 4 (IL-4) T-cell responses, antibody responses, and potent protection against lethal
blood-stage malaria challenge in vivo. Similar results were found with DC pulsed with intact parasitized
Plasmodium yoelii or Plasmodium chabaudi erythrocytes. Cross-strain protection was also induced. High levels
of protection (80 to 100%) against lethal challenge were evident from 10 days after a single immunization and
maintained up to 120 days. Interestingly, correlation studies versus blood-stage protection at different time
points suggest that the immune effector mechanisms associated with protection could change over time.
Antibody-independent, T-cell- and IL-12-associated protection was observed early after immunization, followed

  

Source: Arnold, Jonathan - Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center & Department of Genetics, University of Georgia

 

Collections: Biotechnology