Home

About

Advanced Search

Browse by Discipline

Scientific Societies

E-print Alerts

Add E-prints

E-print Network
FAQHELPSITE MAPCONTACT US


  Advanced Search  

 
vol. 157, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2001 Transgenerational Consequences of Plant Responses to
 

Summary: vol. 157, no. 5 the american naturalist may 2001
Transgenerational Consequences of Plant Responses to
Herbivory: An Adaptive Maternal Effect?
Anurag A. Agrawal*
Department of Entomology and Center for Population Biology,
University of California, Davis, California 95616-8584
Submitted June 14, 1999; Accepted December 21, 2000
abstract: Herbivory has many effects on plants, ranging from shifts
in primary processes such as photosynthesis, growth, and phenology
to effects on defense against subsequent herbivores and other species
interactions. In this study, I investigated the effects of herbivory on
seed and seedling characteristics of several families of wild radish
(Raphanus raphanistrum) to test the hypothesis that herbivory may
affect the quality of offspring and the resistance of offspring to plant
parasites. Transgenerational effects of herbivory may represent adap-
tive maternal effects or factors that constrain or amplify natural
selection on progeny. Caterpillar (Pieris rapae) herbivory to green-
house-grown plants caused plants in some families to produce smaller
seeds and those in other families to produce larger seeds compared
with undamaged controls. Seed mass was positively associated

  

Source: Agrawal, Anurag - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology & Entomollogy, Cornell University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology