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Ecology, 85(4), 2004, pp. 10721084 2004 by the Ecological Society of America
 

Summary: 1072
Ecology, 85(4), 2004, pp. 10721084
2004 by the Ecological Society of America
ECTOMYCORRHIZAL ABUNDANCE AND COMMUNITY COMPOSITION
SHIFTS WITH DROUGHT: PREDICTIONS FROM TREE RINGS
RANDY L. SWATY,1
RON J. DECKERT, THOMAS G. WHITHAM, AND CATHERINE A. GEHRING
Department of Biological Sciences and Merriam-Powell Center for Environmental Research, Northern Arizona University,
Flagstaff, Arizona 86011-5640 USA
Abstract. Mycorrhizae play a key role in ecosystem dynamics, and it is important to
understand how environmental stress and climate change affect these symbionts. Several
climate models predict that the intercontinental western United States will experience an
increase in extreme precipitation events and warming temperatures. In 1996, northern Ar-
izona, USA, experienced a 100-year drought that caused high local mortality of pinyon
pine (Pinus edulis), a dominant tree of the southwest. We compared trunk growth, water
potentials, and ectomycorrhizal dynamics for surviving trees at three high-mortality sites
and adjacent low-mortality sites. Four major patterns emerged. First, surviving trees at sites
that suffered high mortality exhibited reduced long-term growth and increased water stress
relative to adjacent sites where little or no mortality occurred. Second, surviving trees from
high-mortality sites had 50% lower ectomycorrhizal colonization and showed a pronounced

  

Source: Allan, Gery - Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University
Gehring, Catherine "Kitty" - Department of Biological Sciences, Northern Arizona University

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology