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Enrique Amaya The Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, CB2 1QN, United Kingdom; Department of
 

Summary: Xenomics
Enrique Amaya
The Wellcome Trust/Cancer Research UK Gurdon Institute, University of Cambridge, CB2 1QN, United Kingdom; Department of
Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, United Kingdom
Xenopus genomics, or Xenomics for short, is coming of age. Indeed, biological insight into processes such as growth
factor signaling and patterning of the early embryo is now being gained by combining the value of Xenopus as a
model organism for cell and developmental biology with genomic approaches. In this review I address these recent
advances and explore future possibilities gained from combining this powerful experimental system with genomic
approaches, as well as how our quest to understand basic biological principles will be greatly facilitated though the
marriage of Xenopus and genomics.
Xenopus genomics is very much in its infancy. Although large-
scale sequencing efforts were slow to be initiated in this system,
in the past 34 yr there has been an explosion of genomic infor-
mation accumulating in Xenopus laevis and its diploid relative,
Xenopus tropicalis (Fig.1). Since the beginning of 2003, >320,000
sequences have been deposited in public repositories for X. laevis
and >1,100,000 for X. tropicalis, mostly in the form of expressed
sequence tags (ESTs). With this expansive amount of new se-
quence information, X. tropicalis recently jumped into third
place on the list of organisms with the most EST's, behind human

  

Source: Amaya, Enrique - Healing Foundation Centre & Developmental Biology, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine