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A New Method for Estimating Cardiac Transmembrane Potentials from the Body Surface
 

Summary: A New Method for Estimating Cardiac
Transmembrane Potentials from the Body Surface
Shuli Wang and R. Martin Arthur
Electrical and Systems Engineering, School of Engineering and Applied Science,
Washington University in St. Louis
Correspondence: RM Arthur, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus
Box 1127, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130. E-mail: rma@ese.wustl.edu, phone +001 314 935 6167,
fax +001 314 935 7500
Abstract. Transmembrane potentials (TMPs) on the heart surface can be used to calculate body-
surface potentials (BSPs) using a bidomain model, in order, for example, to assess the sensitivity of
BSPs to TMP changes with pathology. Conversely, TMPs can be estimated from BSPs with inverse
methods. In this study, a new inverse approach called regularized waveform identification (RWI) was
developed that combines spatial regularization with temporal optimization to estimate TMPs from
BSPs with greater accuracy than conventional regularization alone. TMPs were estimated throughout
the T wave, using the realistic ventricle-torso model and heart-surface TMPs of the ECGSIM
simulation package. We evaluated the sensitivity of our RWI approach to 1, 2, 5 and 10% electrical
noise on the body surface. Relative errors (RE) of <15% and correlation coefficients (CC) >0.98 were
found. A 10% enlargement of the heart and position errors of 1cm in all directions yielded REs of
<15% and CCs >0.97. Simulation results showed that this approach performed much better than
traditional regularization methods alone and is robust in the presence of noise and geometric error. By

  

Source: Arthur, R. Martin - Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, Washington University in St. Louis

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Engineering