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BIOTROPICA 39(6): 760766 2007 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2007.00330.x The Influence of Large Tree Density on Howler Monkey (Alouatta palliata mexicana)
 

Summary: BIOTROPICA 39(6): 760­766 2007 10.1111/j.1744-7429.2007.00330.x
The Influence of Large Tree Density on Howler Monkey (Alouatta palliata mexicana)
Presence in Very Small Rain Forest Fragments
V´ictor Arroyo-Rodr´iguez1,5, Salvador Mandujano2, Julieta Ben´itez-Malvido3, and Carla Cuende-Fanton4
1Divisi´on de Postgrado, Instituto de Ecolog´ia A. C., Km 2.5 Antigua Carretera a Coatepec No. 351, Xalapa 91070, Veracruz, M´exico
2Departamento de Biodiversidad y Ecolog´ia Animal, Instituto de Ecolog´ia A. C., Km 2.5 Antigua Carretera a Coatepec No. 351, Xalapa 91070,
Veracruz, M´exico
3Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional Aut´onoma de M´exico (UNAM), Ant´igua Carretera a P´atzcuaro No. 8701,
Ex Hacienda de San Jos´e de la Huerta, Morelia 58190, Michoac´an, M´exico
4Universidad Veracruzana, Xalapa, Veracruz, M´exico
ABSTRACT
The populations of the Mexican mantled howler monkey (Alouatta palliata mexicana) in the Los Tuxtlas region, Mexico, have declined drastically due to habitat
loss and fragmentation. Nevertheless, several troops still inhabit very small and isolated rain forest fragments. We identified the main vegetation attributes that can
favor the presence of howlers within 18 small (< 10-ha) fragments that did not differ significantly in size, shape, and isolation (nine occupied and nine unoccupied
by howlers). We found that habitat quality (i.e., food resources and vegetation structure) affected howler incidence in small fragments. Particularly, the occupied
fragments showed greater density of big trees (dbh > 60 cm), greater total basal area, greater basal area of persistent tree species, and greater basal area of top food
species than the unoccupied fragments; suggesting that even for small fragments the loss of big trees and particularly the decrease in size class of the top food species
can negatively affect howler distribution in highly fragmented landscapes. These findings could be used to establish foreground conservation areas for this critically
endangered subspecies in fragmented landscapes of Los Tuxtlas.
Abstract in Spanish is available at http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/btp.

  

Source: Arroyo Rodríguez, Víctor - Centro de Investigaciones en Ecosistemas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

 

Collections: Biology and Medicine; Environmental Sciences and Ecology