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Impact of multiple fires on stand structure and tree regeneration in central Appalachian oak forests
 

Summary: Impact of multiple fires on stand structure and tree
regeneration in central Appalachian oak forests
Stephen A. Signell a,*, Marc D. Abrams a
, Joseph C. Hovis b
, Shannon W. Henry b
a
School of Forest Resources, 203 Forest Resources Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University,
University Park, PA 16802, USA
b
Environmental Division, PA Department of Military and Veterans Affairs,
National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap, Annville, PA 17003-5002, USA
Received 6 May 2005; received in revised form 7 July 2005; accepted 8 July 2005
Abstract
The National Guard Training Center at Fort Indiantown Gap (NGTC-FIG) near Harrisburg, PA, has experienced frequent
fires since the 1950s on the ridges and 1980s in the valleys as a result of military training exercises. This represented a unique
opportunity to investigate the role of recent and repeated fire in oak (Quercus) forests in the eastern USA. We investigated four
frequently burned and two unburned sites replicated in ridge and valley ecosystems. Burned sites generally had lower tree
density and a higher proportion of overstory oak species (6492% relative importance value) than unburned stands (4749%
importance). Oak saplings averaged 875 ha1
in burned forests and 31 ha1

  

Source: Abrams, Marc David - School of Forest Resources, Pennsylvania State University

 

Collections: Environmental Sciences and Ecology